A Renovation Story: Part 1

As you may have noticed, I have not written a blog post since August of last year. The timing of my absence has much to do with the home renovation that has ruled over my waking and sleeping hours over the past 6 months. Although, originally a project that was estimated to take 2-3 months maximum…the timeline has doubled in it’s trajectory. This is the listing photo of house the we made an offer on last February without ever having physically seen the house in person.

Fast forward 5 months later to July, when we closed on the offer after a patient wait for the Estate to reach a resolution. I flew to Kentucky to sign all the necessary paper work and begin planning the future of the property.

This historic shotgun home is located in Clifton, a neighborhood on both the State and National register of Historic places. I devoted some time over Summer to reading and learning about what it meant to be a part of this historic community.

When researching the property, I came across this picture of the home from the year 1950. As you can see from the photo, the lot to the right had not been developed and was still an empty lot.

And now, that I’m finally sitting down to reflect and share the design process. I want to tell the story of the renovation from inception. So, I will do my best to include all the small details that made the project special and fun for me.

Starting with the inspirational photos of shotgun homes in the area. I gathered ideas for updating the entryway, adding a porch or an improved front “stoop”. 

Ultimately, it was a meeting with the Landmarks commission that ruled out many of these improvements to the original “footprint” of the home. Although, my case worker was extremely helpful, it would have been a challenge to have any dramatic changes made to the front of the property without finding evidence of a porch or a proof that my property was set back from other properties in the same line. From this first meeting, I resolved to focus on the exterior finishes and adding a patio of pavers to the back of the property instead vs a porch on the front.

The back porch is completely shaded in evening, so this seemed like a logical choice.

I learned that Louisville, Kentucky and New Orleans currently have the largest number of these homes in the nation. Our particular house is referred to as a camelback house, which means there is an upper floor that attaches to the back of the house. Here is what the original “camel” back of the house looked like.

We made a few simple changes to rethink the back of the home and add a patio.

I will share the results of the renovation each week! So come back to see how a few adjustments to the door alignment and windows have realigned the property.

 

 

 

Posted in Interior Design and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. RSS feed for this post. Leave a trackback.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Swedish Greys - a WordPress theme from Nordic Themepark.